High-Impact Entrepreneurship

Endeavor Entrepreneur Vinny Lingham on South Africa, entrepreneurship, and his latest business venture

Reprinted from the Daily Maverick. See original article here

By Rebecca Davis

South African tech entrepreneur Vinny Lingham is about to launch his new venture, Gyft, from his base in Palo Alto, California. Rebecca Davis talked to him about life as a start-up guru, how SA government policies are harming investment, and why he’s putting his money where his mouth is when it comes to turning Cape Town into a technology hub.

Vinny Lingham, at age 33, “has forgotten more about acquiring traffic than a lot of people in Silicon Valley know”, to quote a TechCrunch article in 2010. He made his name in search marketing, establishing Clicks2Customers and its holding company, incuBeta, aged 24. Then he founded Yola, a business offering free website building and hosting, which today has seven million users. Then he moved from Cape Town to Silicon Valley. Seven months ago he stepped down as the CEO of Yola to focus on his next big thing: Gyft.

That’s more action – and success – packed into a decade than many people manage in a lifetime. So perhaps it’s not altogether surprising to find that Lingham does not lack  confidence in an interview situation, albeit one carried out down a crackly Skype line.

With three companies behind him and another on the way, Lingham is living the start-up dream. But he’s quick to state that his lifestyle is nothing like the dotcom tycoon of popular stereotype. “Not all entrepreneurs drive around in big cars with fancy houses. I live in a modest little apartment. It’s nice, but it’s just two bedrooms,” he says.

“The difference between entrepreneurs and other people is that you work for a lot lower salary on a monthly basis, but then you’re building long-term equity wealth and value in your shares and the companies you build. Ambition often comes with sacrifice.”

He’s been living in the US for just over four years now. On his first visit to Silicon Valley, in 2002, it wasn’t a very appealing place to be – the market was dead, and not much exciting was happening. But after Google’s acquisition of YouTube in 2006, energy returned to the valley. At the time, Lingham was spending five months of the year on a plane between the US and South Africa, juggling Clicks2Customers’ substantial American client base.

“I built (Clicks2Customers) up within three and a half years to a $10 million-a-year business, with only one South African client. So all the revenue was coming from the States.”

Clients ranged from eBay to Expedia, and Lingham attributes the search marketing company’s success to his own technical know-how. “I understood the techniques to rank keywords for clients higher than anyone else,” he says simply.

“Other people try and start businesses with a very shallow knowledge of the field that they’re in, and it’s difficult to teach someone else if you don’t know how to do it yourself. So I spent many years building up my knowledge and developed a unique insight into how Google’s algorithms work, and we were able to use that to our advantage.”

But the constant travel to ensure that American clients were happy wore him down, and saw the chain set in motion whereby he left the company in order to start Yola in 2007, and made the move to Silicon Valley shortly afterwards.

Four years down the line, there’s still not a trace of American in Lingham’s accent. He says he doesn’t consider himself at all American. “I’m a South African citizen, and I love South Africa, although I’m disappointed in the way things are going. My mother-in-law was attacked last week in her house in Cape Town. These stories are becoming far too common, and it’s quite disheartening. But I’d love to go back one day, although right now it’s a career choice.”

Lingham maintains strong South African ties: he still has fingers in a lot of business pies, and he actively invests in and mentors entrepreneurial talent in the country. He was also a co-founder of the Silicon Cape Initiative, which aims to turn the Western Cape into a tech hub. He thinks the province is the perfect place for this.

“There’s a similar vibe to Silicon Valley, some fantastic tech companies, and the culture is nice and diverse – people from all around the world live there,” he says. “It’s not just about Cape Town, it’s about South Africa, but you’ve got to start somewhere, and tech hubs needs to be geographically centralised, and Cape Town makes a lot of sense.”

His frustration at what he sees as the South African government’s obstructionism in making it difficult for expatriates to make a meaningful economic contribution from overseas is a theme he returns to continually. He cites the notorious “loop structure”, which refers to the prohibition on South African residents holding any South African assets indirectly through a non-resident entity. (Moneyweb once suggested that the loop structure “has probably scuppered more cross-border transactions contemplated by South African residents than any other exchange control or tax policy”.)

Lingham describes the loop structure as a “stupid rule from apartheid. I want to hire South African employees, and I want to give them stock options, in order to build up a culture, to build the business. I’m not allowed to do it.” He sees this as exemplifying the government’s blinkeredness when it comes to making the country an attractive prospect for investors.

“The biggest mistake that the government and people of South Africa (are) making is to think that South Africa is going to be the biggest economy in Africa in 10 to 15 years,” he warns. “South Africa is no longer the gatewa

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