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Endeavor and Linda Rottenberg Profiled in The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor, a U.S.-based international news publication, recently profiled Endeavor CEO Linda Rottenberg and the story of Endeavor, spotlighting the organization’s journey and its rapidly growing global impact. In particular, the article calls […]

April 16th, 2014 — by admin

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Egyptian Entrepreneur Amr Shady profiled in UK’s Entrepreneur Country magazine

Endeavor Entrepreneur Amr Shady, founder and CEO of T.A. Telecom, was recently profiled in Entrepreneur Country, a British magazine that identifies successful global entrepreneurship success stories.  Author Jonathan Simnet, a senior advisor at Ariadne Capital, […]

June 4th, 2013 — by admin

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Content marketing: 5 proven strategies for turning prospects into buyers

Reprinted from womenentrepreneursecrets.blogspot.com. See original post here.

By Donna Gunter

I discovered a few years ago that I had accidentally stumbled upon the new wave of marketing, now referred to as content marketing, as I went about my regular marketing activities. As a card carrying introvert, it’s just always been so much easier to share my knowledge with others rather than trying to sell myself or my products. Ironically enough, that strategy has proven insanely successful for me. At the time, I never looked upon it as a strategy or a system — I just did what naturally came to me. Who knew that I was on the cusp of the newest marketing system about to be adopted by all sorts of companies around the globe?

Today, there is a huge focus on content marketing, and it’s become an entire industry, ironically enough. In a nutshell, content marketing has been defined as a way of communicating with your customers and your prospect without selling. Instead, you deliver valuable information to them that helps them solve their day-to-day problems, rather than constantly pitching your products and services to them.

Why does it work so well? Consumers have become numb from marketing overwhelm between the television, radio, and magazine advertising, as well as online banner ads. They have learned to tune out everything that doesn’t relate to their current issue at hand, but will pay attention to great sources that help them in their search for relevant information. They then reward that sharing of valuable information with their loyalty by purchasing from you, someone that they like, know and trust.

Here are 5 proven strategies to help you use your content to turn prospects into buyers via content marketing:

1. Provide great information. Great content is not equal to a thinly disguised sales pitch for a product. If you’re going to bother to create content for your target market, make it worthwhile for them to read. Provide at least 2 valuable tips your reader can use to move forward or solve an issue. Please don’t waste their time by focusing your entire piece of content on why they have the problem. They already know that a problem exists — they are coming to you for solutions.

2. Mix it up. I just read that today’s teens and 20-somethings rely less and less on web sites as way to get the solutions to their problems, and their use of email is practically non-existent. So, take your content and package it in a variety of formats and reach out to your prospects where they are or where they hang out, like an audio podcast on iTunes, a screencast video on YouTube, a slide show on Slideshare, quick tips on Twitter and Facebook, or in app for their iPhone or iPad.

3. Boring makes them leave. Just because you’re providing some educational tidbits to your target market doesn’t mean you have to go about it in a boring manner. Put on your copywriting hat and create compelling headlines that make them want to read, view or listen to what you have created. Share your personality and your sense of humor — let you authenticity shine through. Tell entertaining stories that illustrate what you’re talking about,

4. Start with your web site. Even though more and more consumers are getting their information from user-generated sites like iTunes or You Tube, your web site is still your home base and your primary repository for your content. However, you need to educate your visitors on all pages of your site, rather than trying to sell them. Start with your home page and let visitors clearly picture who you are and how you help them solve their problems. Get your prospects to resonate with you by sharing your personal story on your About page. Continue to educate your prospects about what you do and how you do it via your FAQ page.

5. Don’t stop at the sale. Your best customers are those who have already purchased from you. Don’t drop your customers off a cliff once you’ve sold them something. Keep the love alive by continuing to educate them about other issues to which you have solutions, and that will help you build more sales.

Take Action Strategy

If you’re not yet in the business of educating your prospects, there’s no time like today to start that process. You’ll find educating your customers via content marketing a much more rewarding way of marketing your business.

Internet Marketing Coach Donna Gunter helps professional service businesses stop the client chase and create online businesses that drive clients to them. She invites readers to download her free ebook, Turbocharge Your Online Marketing Toolkit, at http://www.TurbochargeYourOnlineMarketing.com

Company press release: Integr8 stays on top of global managed service providers

The following press release was issued by Endeavor company The Integr8 Group. Founded in 2001 by Lance Faranoff and Robert Sussman, Integr8 is the largest privately held ICT company on the African continent, providing a complete range of sophisticated IT outsourcing services.

The Integr8 Group, South Africa’s largest privately owned ICT managed services provider, is the number one Managed Service Provider (MSP) in South Africa for the second consecutive year, the third best in EMEA (Europe Middle East and Africa) and the only South African company amongst the top thirty five worldwide.

This is according to the latest MSPmentor 100 Report brought out by the global guide to managed services produced by Nine Lives Media, a division of Penton Media. The annual report is a culmination of analysis and expert review by international industry specialists. It is based on calculated index measurement metrics that include overall managed services revenue, overall managed services revenue growth and number of devices managed, as well as global standards. This is the second year in a row Integr8 has been listed as the top MSP in SA and also the second year running it has achieved listing amongst the top fifty companies globally, with a ranking of 33rd.

Robert Sussman, joint CEO at Integr8, is immensely proud of the company’s proven position in the way it delivers its leading edge services. He believes this success is down to a combination of over a decade’s worth of experience in building the technology, educating the best minds in the industry and instilling a culture of relentless winners. The core aggregation of this comes together in the company’s client centric entrenched Nerve Centre® operation and leveraged platform.

“The Nerve Centre® has once again been recognized as a leading core offering where we differentiate ourselves by not only the innovative services provided, but the way in which these are provisioned. An independent rating from MSPmentor, solidifies our roadmap, whereby we are comfortable that we remain 18 to 24 months ahead of the closest global competitor,” says Sussman.

“We have the critical mass the publically traded companies maintain, yet we have coupled entrepreneurial innovation that is core to our value system as we are one hundred percent privately owned by people that work in the company. Our Nerve Centre® is a cohesive, tight unit and we are able to deliver a proactive, instantaneous service as a result of this operation and the established platform that we have developed. This incorporates our technology insight, infrastructure, expertise, intelligence and ability to pro-act on change, not react to it. This is what the market demands and this is the level of agility we have to continue to instill,” he adds.

The Fifth Annual MSPmentor 100 Report, incorporating a list of the world’s top 100 MSPs was unveiled in a live webcast on 15 February.

Reflections on the state of venture capital [Video, Transcript]

Endeavor is pleased to make public the following transcript and video from a panel at the 2011 Endeavor Entrepreneur Summit in San Francisco. The event, which assembled over 450 entrepreneurs and global business leaders, featured dozens of entrepreneurship-related presentations by top CEOs and industry experts.

Overview: This panel of leading US venture capitalist explores the role of US venture investment in emerging markets and discusses both the challenges and opportunities of investing in entrepreneurs abroad.

Participants:

Moderator – Phil Wickham: President and CEO Kauffman Fellows Program – The Center for Venture Education
Matt Cohler; General Partner, Benchmark
Jeff Bussgang; General Partner, Flybridge Capital and author of Mastering the VC Game
Dave McClure; Founding Partner, 500 Startups
Stuart Francis; Vice Chairman, Barclays Capital
Dan Senor; Senior Advisor, Eliot Management and Co-author Startup Nation

Full transcript:

Phil: We’re here to talk about venture capital in emerging markets, and we’ve got an expert panel from Silicon with some insights from other parts of the world and want to jump right into their ideas and contents for your benefit.

Phil Introduces panelists:

Dan Senor is with Eliot Management. He’s a co-author of Startup Nation, well immersed in the New York and Israeli dynamic.

Stuart Fancis is the Vice Chairman of Barclay’s Capital. Stu is our authority on capital markets.

Dave McClure from 500 Startups is one of the real pioneers in the angel wave.

Jeff Bussgang, from Flybridge Capital. Jeff is a start-up manager extraordinaire, an author extraordinaire, a teacher extraordinaire—he teaches with us at the Kauffman Fellows Program—and has put together one of the hot young venture brands, carrying the flag for the Boston venture market.

Matthew Cohler, of Benchmark. Unless you’ve been living under a rock you know that Benchmark is not only one of the premier brands in terms of returns but in terms of conduct and entrepreneur eccentricity. Has been characterized as “the most networked person on earth.”

We have a pretty deep relationship with Endeavor. We know a lot of the entrepreneurs. The entrepreneurs that come out of this ecosystem are nothing short of spectacular. Not just in terms of performance but in the tough environments in which they work. (more…)

Turkey’s B-fit chain empowers women, attracts female entrepreneurs

Reprinted with permission from Today’s Zaman. You can find the original article here.

B-Fit, started by serial entrepreneur Bedriye Hülya, joined Endeavor in 2009. B-fit is the first chain of women-only gyms in Turkey, and uses a franchising model which empowers other Turkish women as they are entirely women staffed and managed.

B-fit, the first women-only gym chain in Turkey, which empowers women by selling franchises to women entrepreneurs only, is also attracting investment in overseas franchises as its business grows larger.

It is currently aiming to have a total of 300 branches by the end of 2012.

B-fit is a 100-percent Turkish brand and a workout program designed for women to get slim through 30-minute workout sessions in which the exercise changes every 30 seconds while the women exercising follow the instructor. Women of all ages come to work out at the sessions which professional trainers with college degrees in the field conduct. Also, each participant’s pulse is measured every 10 minutes during the session to make sure everything is going well.

The founder of the business, Bedriye Hülya, told Sunday’s Zaman she attended a similar workout program in the US while studying psychology in New York. She also studied circuit training, after which she decided to start her own business in the field. Hülya said she researched the machines and their functions and talked to almost every single machine producer in the US before she started her business. She had already moved back to Turkey and, after two years of going back and forth between the US and Turkey to develop the right machines for her b-fit program, she finally started her business in 2006 in the western province of İzmir.

Hülya was cited as an example of one of Turkey’s great entrepreneurs by US Vice President Joe Biden when he spoke at the Second Global Entrepreneurship Summit in İstanbul during his visit to Turkey in December. She was also chosen as one of Turkey’s best entrepreneurs by endeavor.org in 2009.

The gym saw a lot of participation from the women of İzmir, which is also Hülya’s hometown. In the course of a year, Hülya had opened two more gyms in İzmir and one in İstanbul. The business got a lot of attention after Hülya gave a newspaper interview, with women demanding a franchise license. B-fit opened another 10 gyms in 2007, another 15 in 2008, another 30 in 2009 and another 52 in 2010 throughout the country, in addition to branches in Northern Cyprus as well as a branch in Germany. Although the numbers for 2011 have not yet been released, Hülya said it should be well over 52 branches. She added that the company’s target is to have open 300 b-fit gyms in total by the end of the year. The main areas where b-fit would like to sell franchises are the Black Sea and central Anatolian regions. The company also plans to increase the number of branches abroad, especially in Central Asia and the Middle East, in the coming years to give women a chance to empower themselves in developing countries.

Hülya noted b-fit is a great opportunity for women to start their own business and calls the company’s policy to only sell franchises to women positive discrimination. She said even though it may be difficult for women to adapt to a work environment since they are not used to it and may be easily de-motivated by the challenges that come with the job, women are very creative, pay attention to small details and understand each other very well. She added that working with only women is the main driver of the company’s success and rapid growth.

Company procedures require that women who plan to open a franchise gym be ambitious and friendly. These women must also be in need — this doesn’t necessarily mean financial need, but they have a need for success, fulfillment or achievement. They must be solution-oriented individuals rather than problem-oriented. A franchise costs TL 60,000, which covers the costs of machines, brand rights and furniture. Hülya says franchisees must give 4 percent of their earnings to b-fit and recommends they implement company rules well in order to be successful in the business. The company requires franchisees to offer a seminar once a month about nutrition and healthy eating, in addition to organizing member activities such as going out to dinners, events, movies and the theater. B-fit sends out inspectors to branches and also checks on them by sending out secret customers.

B-fit chose a clear apple on a green background as its symbol for promoting a healthy lifestyle. So far, the company has 80,000 members who have lost 50 tons of weight. Fifty percent of their members are working women, 30 percent are housewives while 20 percent are students. The monthly fee for membership varies between TL 50 and TL 150, depending on the location of the gym, and it provides an additional 20 percent discount to students.

PiLA field report: Mexico City

PiLA members and Endeavor Entrepreneurs at the Endeavor Mexico Gala

The following comes from recent Princeton University graduate Julia Kaplan, who is working with Endeavor Entrepreneurs in Mexico as part of the PiLA program.

The Princeton in Latin America (PiLA) is a non-profit organization that has been partnering with non-profits throughout Latin America since 2002 to match them with young, public sector professionals seeking full-year fellowships in development work. The program was co-founded by Endeavor staff member Allen Taylor.

When I told people I was going to live in Mexico City for a year, the most common response I heard was, “Are you crazy?” Let’s just say that most Americans have a very narrow perspective of Mexico, informed by various negative news reports and State Department travel warnings. However, I had done my research, and knew that there was much more to Mexico than security issues, including an exciting, fast-growing entrepreneurial ecosystem that I was about to join as a Princeton in Latin America fellow at Endeavor Mexico. And in fact, my time in the bustling metropolis of “el DF” has been a truly exciting adventure.

My job at Endeavor Mexico, in the Search & Selection area, involves profiling our entrepreneur candidates so that when mentors come to Local and International Selection Panels, they have a strong understanding of the entrepreneur and their business before interviewing them. This allows Endeavor to make the most of the limited time they have at selection panels to screen and select the most promising high-impact entrepreneurs. The Endeavor profile may seem like a simple report on the surface, but many hours of work go into its creation. I get to know the entrepreneurs’ businesses inside and out as I accompany them to interviews with Endeavor mentors and hold one-on-one sessions to get in-depth insights into their operating model, governance structure, company culture, and personal story. The range of individuals and companies we work with is astounding, and I have come to have a deep understanding of fields as diverse as mobile technology, personal care products, organic agriculture, and software, to name a few.

I have also learned a lot from the people I interact with, including my coworkers — who are not only my colleagues, but also my friends. This is definitely the most fun office I have ever worked in! I also learn so much from the entrepreneurs, and especially our fantastic mentors, who always have something new to teach us about the business world. And this all happens in Spanish! At first I was very conscious of the language barrier, but now it has become second nature to me, which is one of my biggest accomplishments from my time so far in Mexico.

Apart from all that I have learned in the office, there is so much that daily life in Mexico City has taught me, such as:

– How to squeeze onto an unbelievably crowded bus in the morning and live to tell the tale
- When to properly use the ever-present guey and the many other Mexican slang words
- Appreciating quesadillas de huitlacoche—that would be corn fungus, and yes, it’s delicious
- The necessity of greeting everyone with a kiss on the cheek in all circumstances—just shaking hands would be rude!
- How to cook a turkey…

That last one might seem random, but one thing I have noticed is that I have as much to teach my Mexican friends as they do to teach me, and I absolutely had to cook them Thanksgiving dinner! That is one example of the moments I would have never had if I stayed in the US after graduating. I am so glad I came to Endeavor Mexico for this incredible and unique experience!

A conversation with Marc Benioff, Founder & CEO of Salesforce.com [Video, Transcript]

Endeavor is pleased to make public the following transcript and video from a presentation at the 2011 Endeavor Entrepreneur Summit in San Francisco. The event, which assembled over 450 entrepreneurs and global business leaders, featured dozens of entrepreneurship-related presentations by top CEOs and industry experts.

Overview: As one of the highlights of the Summit, Linda Rottenberg joined Marc Benioff on the stage to host a conversation and facilitate audience questions. Benioff, Chairman and CEO of Salesforce.com, discusses the transformational impact of cloud computing technology and the extraordinary opportunities for entrepreneurs to make an impact today.

Bio: Marc Benioff is chairman and CEO of salesforce.com. He founded the company in 1999 with a vision to create an on-demand information management service that would replace traditional enterprise software technology. Benioff is regarded as the leader of what he has termed “The End of Software,” the now-proven belief that multitenant, cloud computing applications democratize information by delivering immediate benefits at reduced risks and costs. For the full bio, click here.

Full transcript:

Linda: Marc Benioff’s story epitomizes the journey in Silicon Valley from 1980 to today. He started off launching his first company at 15. He then paid his way through college by becoming a programmer at Apple with Steve Jobs working with them in 1984. He then spent 13 years at Oracle working his way up to the inner circles of Oracle, very close to Larry Ellison. And then an unusual decision: at 32, he decided he was a bit burned out and he would go on a sabbatical to India and Hawaii. Then he came back and said he needed a different type of experience. (more…)

Entrepreneurs need mentorship and vision

Reprinted from startupweekend.org. See the original post here.

by Lior Levin

In 2011, it was difficult to go more than one week without hearing from a new tech startup that built the latest iPhone or Android app, or that launched the newest and best way to create, manage, and measure your social media profiles. Add to that on demand television and music, and data mining, and you’ve got a pretty well-rounded look at the landscape of tech startups in 2012 and beyond.

For companies building solutions like those mentioned above, it doesn’t take much money or even that much time to launch and start proof of concept. Long gone are the days spent perfecting pitches for investors, venture capitalists, or even crowdfunding partners (although, startups that get funded during seed-stage have been shown to be more successful).

Instead, the whole product is developed, produced, and marketed before investment money is even needed. These affordable, just-in-time products and services are exactly what have shaped the recent past of the tech startup age.

But can it really sustain the future of these companies?

Learning What Works – Two Keys to Success

Sometimes – often times – startup founders are just too close to their own company’s success to actually realize it. Because outside funding is not necessarily needed for so many small tech firms, founders are not given the opportunity – or the mandate – to learn how to grow a business from the ground up from people who have been there and done that.

Key 1: Mentorship

As the author in a recent Harvard Business Review blog post pointed out, there is much more to startup success than technology itself. “Though we enjoy writing about dropout tech legends, most times their success is catalyzed by others — they came up with the ideas and the investors provided the leadership and the non-tech factors (such as pricing models, branding, and promotions, among others) that propelled them to stardom.”

It takes more than a solution, no matter how awesome the solution is, to create success for a company. Mentors can often help startup founders see the forest for the trees, because it’s both normal and expected for startup founders to become consumed with their technology, and to tune out the other critical business factors.

In fact, mentorship is often cited as a huge propeller of success for tech startups. Companies like Y Combinator – a business incubator that provides seed funding for tech startup hopefuls – exist solely to prepare startups for success. According to their website, Y Combinator has funded over 300 startups since 2005. Among them? Such uber-success story companies as Scribd, Wufoo, and Posterous.

Key 2: Long-Term Vision

One of the side benefits of mentorship is the old adage that two heads are better than one. And sometimes, another person can help tech startup founders – who often go it totally alone – with long-term vision and planning. An article published on yespartners.com suggested that recent statistic evidence shows venture capitalists are more likely to fund companies in areas with high human capital – such as New York. “Experts think that top talent can be a silver bullet for many of the problems that ail a startup, such as a disorganized long-term vision.”

With no long-term vision, these companies are like annual flowering plants with shallow roots. They are easily trampled, victims of bad weather, and die every year, only to be replaced by others just like them.

After all, that’s where the money is, anyway – in the long-term vision. Big investors don’t plan to waste any more time or money in cool ideas that don’t get very far. It’s one thing to create an app or service that is very cool and that all of your friends would pay $1 for. It’s quite another thing to turn that money into profit.

Rest Assured, There is a Future for Tech Startups

No matter what the failure rate is for tech startups, there is no reason for anyone with an excellent idea to not pursue it. Not only is there money to be made, but there are great technological innovations waiting in idea stage for someone with creativity, intelligence, and passion to bring them to life.

There’s no reason for tech startups with promising products and services to go unnoticed anymore, with all of the many resources for leadership, planning, financial support, and programs to bring great minds together to build and sustain profitable companies. The future of tech startups is indeed very bright. All they need are a few helping hands.

Lior Levin is a marketing consultant for the Tel Aviv University’s department of security, and who also consults for a neon sign store that provides custom neon signs.

Hernan Kazah & Khaled Ismail speak about entrepreneurship, Endeavor [Video, Transcript]

Endeavor is pleased to make public the following transcript and video from a presentation at the 2011 Endeavor Entrepreneur Summit in San Francisco. The event, which assembled over 450 entrepreneurs and global business leaders, featured dozens of entrepreneurship-related presentations by top CEOs and industry experts.

Overview: Linda Rottenberg interviews two great Endeavor Entrepreneur success stories, Hernan Kazah and Khaled Ismail, respectively.

Khaled Ismail

Full transcript:

On building SySDSoft and getting acquired

First off, I appreciate Endeavor. I was selected as the first Endeavor Entrepreneur selected from Egypt, even before the Endeavor Egypt office opened in 2007 and it was a turning point for us at that time.

Our story started very simply in 2002 with a very small, incubated, four-engineer start-up in Cairo University and grew to a 125-engineer organization in the course of eight years. We became one of the leaders of building the software that transmits wireless communication systems and even some of the chip sets that do that. By wireless I mean WiFi, WiMAX, all kinds of different flavors of wireless technologies.

If anyone asked me when we started if that was my dream I would be lying if I said yes, because there was no clarity about what we would achieve. It was actually impossible for me to dream that big in 2002 that we will create this small entity inside Cairo University and it would become one of these leaders in high tech, globally. But it did happen and I owe it to the Egyptian engineers, some of them extremely young. Ninety-five percent of our engineers we took fresh out of college, without any experience except for what they learned at college, and they managed to sit and compete with people worldwide who had ten years more experience than they had. So that speaks for this team. They freed me to do the business development because I relied on them to do the technicalities and they did very well. (more…)

Entrepreneurs: time to fire your staff

Reprinted from under30ceo.com. See the original post here.

By Brian Reich

There is little denying that Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, is a genius. He created a site that not only attracts more traffic than any other on the web, but also influences behavior, business, and social norms at an unprecedented level. He is a brilliant software developer. He can sit down and build something that most of us could never even imagine existing with lines of code that almost none of us can understand. But for all that brilliance, I wouldn’t give him the task of solving the education crisis in America. I wouldn’t ask him to do anything that doesn’t relate to his current role. He is not the right fit for the task. But if Facebook were to commit its resources and energy towards tackling the education crisis, Zuckerberg would almost certainly assume a leadership role in that effort because of his existing role as CEO of Facebook.

Thankfully that is a hypothetical situation. But it happens all the time – an existing organizational leader is thrust into a position with another group where they are not a good fit. The person who has been at an organization the longest is seen as the best person to lead because of their depth of understanding and experience. These people are asked to guide an effort, inspire a team, and help an organization transform itself to meet a new set of challenges and it doesn’t work. Worse, we find out too late that they weren’t up for the task.
(more…)

Seven “hard knock” business lessons our moms never taught us

Reprinted from womenentrepreneursecrets.blogspot.com. See original post here.

By Ali Brown

Our mothers may have taught us to say please and thank you, but when it comes to running a business, some of the other things we learned as a girl could hold us back big time. Read on for 7 business tips that allow you to still be a lady AND take care of business.

1. Don’t think that testosterone rules.

When many women start their own businesses, they fall into the trap of thinking that they need to behave like a man in order to succeed. But truly effective and successful leaders determine their own leadership style. When you are running a company, how you present yourself will change, but it should still be consistent with your own personality. We should celebrate our uniqueness—the very things that distinguish us from men—and let our intuition, emotional intelligence, and true natures shine.

2. Don’t be too nice.

To be effective you must get in the habit of not always worrying about what other people are thinking of you. If you are locked into a dispute with a supplier, don’t take it personally. If you have to bring up a difficult topic such as an employee’s poor performance, be firm and clear about what you want from them and point out how their actions are having a negative effect. When you are finished, allow them the opportunity to have their say. There’s a way to be assertive, not hard-nosed, in a way that maintains your role as the leader.

3. Don’t expect the world to come to you.

Don’t be shy about coming forward—not just to drive sales—but to become a permanent presence in the minds of your customers. There are loads of things you can do to get your business noticed. Blog about your area of expertise, get stories in the media, tell everyone about what you do, reward loyal customers, launch a new product, and promote events. If you don’t toot your own horn, no one else will!

4. Don’t give away the store.

Adding value to your services keeps customers coming back for more, but don’t let fear or insecurity drive your decisions. Discounts and extra bonus products are necessary sometimes, but think of ways of adding extra value that won’t cost a cent. Don’t compare yourself to the competition or try to match their giveaways. If you’re strong and confident in what you do, there’s no need to charge less or to continually look over your shoulder.

5. Don’t disguise statements as questions.

Statements are disguised as questions because women fear they will be seen as assertive, or they’re worried about the risk of sounding foolish. However, questions sound weak—statements are stronger. Get into the habit of making statements and only ask questions when there is a need. Solicit opinions after setting out your proposals. It suggests that you are open to hearing other opinions and gives the impression that you are in control.

6. Do play to WIN.

Are you worried about meeting targets, or whether the business will collapse? If so, you are playing not-to-lose when you should be playing to WIN. The best you can achieve here is not losing. And that mindset will not get you where you want to go. Don’t waste energy devising Plan B if things take a downturn. Ensure that you have the drive and tenacity to pursue your dreams. If you take the attitude of failure not being an option, you’d be surprised how much you’ll achieve.

7. Do value your time.

As a business owner, it’s essential to start thinking of your time as money. Don’t shortchange yourself by giving your time away for free, or wasting time on tedious tasks that don’t generate money for your business. Start thinking of ways you can delegate tasks, from grocery shopping to researching leads, so you can focus on the BIG fish, like landing that top-dollar client, planning your next big product, etc. The good news is you do NOT have to do it all!

Entrepreneur mentor Ali Brown teaches women around the world how to start and grow profitable businesses that make a positive impact. Get her free CD “Top 10 Secrets for Entrepreneurial Women” at www.AliBrown.com.

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