High-Impact Entrepreneurship

Get RSS Feed

Veramiko named “Entrepreneurs of 2013″ by CNN Expansión

Vidal Cantu and Guillermo Farias, the founders of Veramiko, were named “Entrepreneurs of 2013″ by leading Mexican business magazine CNN Expansión. As part of this honor, Vidal and Guillermo were featured on the cover of Expansión’s May 2013 edition. To see more information on the magazine’s website, click here.

Founded in 2006, Veramiko’s signature product is InTeam.com, an integrated intranet solution designed to foster workplace collaboration. InTeam.com has all of the features of social networks, such as profiles, “walls”, and news feeds, plus specialized business applications including project management tools, file sharing, wikis, and groups.

Vidal and Guillermo were selected by Endeavor at its December 2012 International Selection Panel in Miami.

 

Start-up Conference and Radio Interview Cap Intensive Week for Endeavor in Miami

As Endeavor seeks board members for our first U.S.-based affiliate office in Miami, Endeavor’s profile rose this week with a visit by President Fernando Fabre and a Miami Herald radio interview with co-founder, Peter Kellner.
(See here to learn more about Endeavor’s recent announcement to launch in Miami)

Fernando was in Miami to participate in a panel discussion at the inaugural Startup City: Miami conference sponsored by The Atlantic in partnership with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

There, leading entrepreneurs and tech experts from across the country joined hundreds of Miami-based business leaders and entrepreneurs at the New World Center for a day of discussions about different aspects of the city’s innovation ecosystem. Fernando spoke on a panel called “Innovation Roundtable: Sparking Start-up Success.”

And click: “Creating an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem in Miami,” to hear The Miami Herald interview with Peter Kellner about Endeavor’s decision to launch in Miami.

2012 Endeavor Gala Highlights Game-Changing Entrepreneurship

On Thursday, November 8, over 450 people attended the 2012 Endeavor Gala at 583 Park Avenue in New York City. Endeavor’s only annual fundraising event, the Gala raises about $2.0 million each year to further Endeavor Global’s mission to select and accelerate the best high-impact entrepreneurs around the world.

Endeavor co-founder & CEO Linda Rottenberg said that this year, in honor of Endeavor’s 15th anniversary, the team wanted to do “something special.” The organization invited five game-changing Endeavor Entrepreneurs, Nikos Kakavoulis of Daily Secret (Greece); Yasmine Shihata of Venus Media & PR (Egypt); Bento Koike of Tecsis (Brazil); Nevzat Aydin of Yemeksepeti.com (Turkey); and Martin Migoya of Globant (Argentina), to participate in a panel discussion on entrepreneurship.

Rottenberg explained that in the wake of the chaos Hurricane Sandy wreaked on New York City, she wanted Gala guests to understand why Endeavor views high-impact entrepreneurship as the answer to many of the global economy’s problems.

“[Entrepreneurs] do view our increasingly chaotic world much differently than most of us,” Rottenberg said. “For them, chaos is not the enemy, chaos is their friend. When economies turn down, entrepreneurs look up…I invite you into our world, and I think that once you meet these big dreamers, you’ll understand why we’re so hopeful about the future at Endeavor.”

 

In addition to the panel discussion, attendees heard from Endeavor Global Chairman Edgar Bronfman, Jr.

Bronfman, Jr. thanked donors and partners for their commitment to Endeavor. “What you’re doing  and how you’re helping us is absolutely critical to creating entrepreneurial ecosystems in each of these countries,” he said.

Dinner ended with a performance by up-and-coming UK singer Rumer! Following dinner, guests enjoyed Endeavor’s annual after-party, with special guest DJ Hannah Bronfman.

Click here to view photos from the Gala cocktail and dinner. Click here to view photos taken in front of the Endeavor banner.

 

Global Entrepreneurship Week Endeavor Tip of the Day: Start Local but Plan to be Global

Part of a series: Ten Rules for Becoming a High-Impact Entrepreneur

The following post is from an upcoming study by Endeavor’s Center for High-Impact Entrepreneurship (C-HIE) on key success strategies for start-ups. The study is based on interviews with 55 High-Impact Endeavor Entrepreneurs from 11 countries. In honor of Global Entrepreneurship Week, we’re sharing five of our favorite “Rules for Becoming a High-Impact Entrepreneur” from this study, with input from some wise Endeavor friends. The full report will be available soon.

Today’s most admired startups – the Facebooks, Googles and LinkedIns of the world – are global companies that started in local markets. Let’s take Facebook as an example. Zuckerberg started Facebook on a very local level, testing out the original concept at Harvard College. Over time, Facebook grew nationally and then globally. Today, Facebook has more than 800 million active users, more than 75% of whom live outside of the United States.

Reid Hoffman, Endeavor Global Board Member and Founder & Executive Chairman of LinkedIn, spoke about why it’s important to “start local but plan to be global” at the 2011 Endeavor Entrepreneur Summit.

“You might as well shoot for something large because you can still end up with something smaller. And part of the reason this is a rule of entrepreneurship is because if you don’t start out aiming for the big game, you almost never can get there. It’s gotta be, ‘How can I have a global impact?’ I think all high-impact companies basically have to think globally in nature these days because of the way that the market ecosystem is going. You go, ‘okay, how do I play onto that stage?’ ….One of the biggest challenges is how to build something really strong with a local focus and then participate on the global stage. For example, we launched LinkedIn with thirteen countries on the list and I think we got to the full list within four months, because as each person complained that their country wasn’t on the list, we added it in.”

Research completed by Endeavor’s Center for High-Impact Entrepreneurship suggests that the most successful entrepreneurs started local but planned to be global.

Among the best entrepreneurs interviewed – those whose companies have grown at an average rate of 20% or greater over the last three years –74% focused on succeeding locally at first, in order to perfect the fundamental aspects of their business model, but they aspired to be global, and designed their business in a way that would allow them to expand globally in the future.

When Endeavor Colombia Entrepreneur Lilian Simbaqueba founded LiSim in 1996, she knew she would have to expand beyond Colombia to be high-impact.

Initially, LiSim had plenty of business opportunities in Colombia, so Lilian decided to focus first on building a very strong business in the local market. When the financial crisis hit Colombia, however, risk to LiSim’s core business increased substantially. Lilian decided the time was ripe to expand internationally. One of LiSim’s existing clients had a bank in Ecuador – creating a natural link to a new market. After Ecuador, LiSim’s geographic expansion continued, mostly by “pulling” from existing contacts and clients. ACCION International brought LiSim to Peru and Bolivia, and the World Bank to Egypt and South Africa. Throughout the expansion process Lilian had to make small adjustments to the model, but the core business model she’d perfected in Colombia has remained the same. Today LiSim operates in 20 countries.

Global Entrepreneurship Week Endeavor Tip of the Day: Get other people’s money and advice

Part of a series: Ten Rules for Becoming a High-Impact Entrepreneur

The following post is from an upcoming study by Endeavor’s Center for High-Impact Entrepreneurship (C-HIE) on key success strategies for start-ups. The study is based on interviews with 55 High-Impact Endeavor Entrepreneurs from 11 countries. In honor of Global Entrepreneurship Week, we’re sharing five of our favorite “Rules for Becoming a High-Impact Entrepreneur” from this study, with input from some wise Endeavor friends. The full report will be available soon.

Entrepreneurs can’t do it all alone: research has verified that enlisting equity investors and talented advisors helps entrepreneurs overcome early risks to their business.

Jeff Bussgang is a General Partner at Flybridge Capital Partners, an Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Harvard Business School’s Rock Center for Entrepreneurship, and the author of Mastering the VC Game and seeingbothsides.com. He spoke to Endeavor about why it’s critical to “get other people’s money and advice.”

“It is easy to fall in love with your own idea, but harder to convince others. The process of pursuing other people’s money and counsel forces a rigor of thought and battle testing of the plan. Obviously, raising capital can provide resources to help with rapid expansion, but access to the advice of investors and trusted advisors is arguably an even more important component to success. Experienced investors, such as angels and venture capitalists, are pattern matching animals that have been exposed to a wide variety of startup situations and people – allowing them to avoid common pitfalls and accelerate progress. But if you’re going to choose an investor, choose very carefully – it’s a mutual relationship. Be sure to do as much due diligence on them as they conduct on you.”

Research completed by Endeavor’s Center for High-Impact Entrepreneurship found that Endeavor Entrepreneurs sought outside help by:

1. Enlisting equity investors and/or sharing financial risk with their customers and suppliers. Sixty-six percent of Endeavor Entrepreneurs interviewed had at least two funding sources when they started.

2. Seeking outside advice from mentors. Seventy-four percent of the best entrepreneurs interviewed – those whose companies have grown at an average rate of 20% or greater over the last three years – had strongly engaged mentors when they were founding their business.

Endeavor South Africa Entrepreneur Carlo Gonzaga believes that multiple heads (and check books) really are better than one.

Carlo Gonzaga started pizza chain Scooters (today under the umbrella of Taste Holdings) with about 90% of his own savings. Knowing, however, that getting outside capital would help to grow the business more quickly, he also sought additional funding sources. His first strategic investor was a casual dining restaurant group named Nando’s. Their collaboration was not strictly financial; Nando’s support not only gave Scooters more credibility as a restaurant franchiser, but also provided Carlo with knowledgeable advisors from the restaurant industry. With Nando’s executives and a board of directors as mentors, Carlo was able to quickly expand his pizza chain to other restaurant franchises.

In 2011, Taste Holdings listed on the Johannesburg stock exchange.

Contact us

Press center

Community

Newsletter Sign Up